Articles for Professionals

Supporting Spiritual Giftedness

by Deborah Fraser Spiritual giftedness is not as easy to identify as gifts in the sciences or humanities and apart from the Nobel peace prize, there is little in the way of awards or accolades for those whose gifts lie in the spiritual realm. The spiritual dimension...

Is It A Cheetah?

by Stephanie S. Tolan A Speech Given at the Hollingworth Conference for the Highly Gifted, 1992 It's a tough time to raise, teach or be a highly gifted child. As the term "gifted" and the unusual intellectual capacity to which that term refers become more and more...

An Interview with Janet Davidson: Reflections on Gender and Giftedness

  SENG's Editor in Chief, Dr. Michael Shaughnessy, interviews Janet E. Davidson on gender, expertise, creativity, intelligence theories, and other aspects of giftedness. An Interview with Janet Davidson: Reflections on Gender and Giftedness Question: Dr. Davidson, you...

Exceptionally Gifted Children: Different Minds

There are few descriptions in the literature of the cognitive processes of exceptionally gifted children. This study, based on testing profiles, anecdotes collected from parents, and observations made during family and group therapy sessions with moderately and exceptionally gifted children delineates some of the characteristic modes of thinking that differentiate exceptionally gifted children from their more moderately gifted peers.

Do We Know if Gifted Children are Being Served Appropriately?

by James R. Delisle Before I begin to answer this question, let me put it into a context that is current: The movie Titanic had become the most profitable movie of all time. Yet, oddly, Titanic is a story of a mistake. The makers of the movie pulled it back from a...

Underachievement in Exceptionally Gifted Adolescents and Young Adults: A Psychiatrist’s View

A group of exceptionally gifted adolescents between the ages of 14 and 25 were each treated in individual psychotherapy over the course of a number of years. They were referred for symptoms of anxiety, depression, self-destructive behavior, and underachievement. Each phase of their gifted development was accompanied by particular anxieties and conflicts. In adolescence they developed a powerful personal vision, a sense of destiny, and a charismatic personality. Their inability to resolve conflicts about these particular gifted traits led to their most dramatic forms of underachievement and self-destructive behavior.

Gifted and Learning Disabled: A Neuropsychologist’s Perspective

by Nadia Webb and Antara Dietrich A neuropsychologist is not the first professional a family consults. I still spend time correcting people when they ask if I am a “Nurse/Psychologist.” Neuropsychologists work with neurologically-based behavior concerns such as...

Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnosis of Gifted Children

by James T. Webb, Edward R. Amend, Nadia E. Webb, Jean Goerss, Paul Beljan, F. Richard Olenchak For more information about medical misdiagnosis of the gifted, please visit the SENG Misdiagnosis Initiative page. Many gifted and talented children (and adults) are being...

ADHD and Children Who Are Gifted

by James T. Webb and Diane Latimer Howard's teachers say he just isn't working up to his ability. He doesn't finish his assignments, or just puts down answers without showing his work; his handwriting and spelling are poor. He sits and fidgets in class, talks to...

The Gifted Identity Formation Model: In search of the gifted identity, from abstract concept to workable counseling constructs

Knowing one’s giftedness and having a well-developed sense of identity as a gifted person are crucial for the development of the self. Many gifted people struggle with their giftedness, what it means to be gifted and how to develop that potential because there are few models available to assist in the identity development and counseling of gifted people. Moreover, identity itself is often viewed as an abstract concept, making the task of bridging this concept to pragmatic applications highly challenging.
The Gifted Identity Formation Model, presented here, helps bridge the theoretical with the practical, includes identity and its formation as crucial variables in the counseling process and uses identity as the baseline for intervention. The model aids with assessment and helps deliver counseling related interventions that explore and strengthen the identity and identity formation of gifted people, in turn enhancing the health and development of the self.

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