Articles for Professionals

Do We Know if Gifted Children are Being Served Appropriately?

by James R. Delisle Before I begin to answer this question, let me put it into a context that is current: The movie Titanic had become the most profitable movie of all time. Yet, oddly, Titanic is a story of a mistake. The makers of the movie pulled it back from a...

Underachievement in Exceptionally Gifted Adolescents and Young Adults: A Psychiatrist’s View

A group of exceptionally gifted adolescents between the ages of 14 and 25 were each treated in individual psychotherapy over the course of a number of years. They were referred for symptoms of anxiety, depression, self-destructive behavior, and underachievement. Each phase of their gifted development was accompanied by particular anxieties and conflicts. In adolescence they developed a powerful personal vision, a sense of destiny, and a charismatic personality. Their inability to resolve conflicts about these particular gifted traits led to their most dramatic forms of underachievement and self-destructive behavior.

Gifted and Learning Disabled: A Neuropsychologist’s Perspective

by Nadia Webb and Antara Dietrich A neuropsychologist is not the first professional a family consults. I still spend time correcting people when they ask if I am a “Nurse/Psychologist.” Neuropsychologists work with neurologically-based behavior concerns such as...

Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnosis of Gifted Children

by James T. Webb, Edward R. Amend, Nadia E. Webb, Jean Goerss, Paul Beljan, F. Richard Olenchak For more information about medical misdiagnosis of the gifted, please visit the SENG Misdiagnosis Initiative page. Many gifted and talented children (and adults) are being...

ADHD and Children Who Are Gifted

by James T. Webb and Diane Latimer Howard's teachers say he just isn't working up to his ability. He doesn't finish his assignments, or just puts down answers without showing his work; his handwriting and spelling are poor. He sits and fidgets in class, talks to...

The Gifted Identity Formation Model: In search of the gifted identity, from abstract concept to workable counseling constructs

Knowing one’s giftedness and having a well-developed sense of identity as a gifted person are crucial for the development of the self. Many gifted people struggle with their giftedness, what it means to be gifted and how to develop that potential because there are few models available to assist in the identity development and counseling of gifted people. Moreover, identity itself is often viewed as an abstract concept, making the task of bridging this concept to pragmatic applications highly challenging.
The Gifted Identity Formation Model, presented here, helps bridge the theoretical with the practical, includes identity and its formation as crucial variables in the counseling process and uses identity as the baseline for intervention. The model aids with assessment and helps deliver counseling related interventions that explore and strengthen the identity and identity formation of gifted people, in turn enhancing the health and development of the self.

Before Referring a Gifted Child for ADD/ADHD Evaluation

by Sharon Lind Parents and gifted educators are asked with increased frequency to instruct gifted children to conform to a set of societal standards of acceptable behavior and achievement -- to smooth the edges of the square peg in order to fit into a "normal" hole....

Bright Star — Black Sky: A Phenomenological Study of Depression as a Window Into the Psyche of the Gifted Adolescent

This qualitative study investigated the lived experience of the depressive state of ten gifted adolescents. In-depth unstructured interviews were conducted, transcribed and analyzed to reveal the essence, structure and meaning of the depressive state for each of the subjects. The analysis revealed a complex stratum of influences fueling the depressive experience. At the core of the experience is the gifted teen’s absolute need for knowledge forcommunion and for expression. The analysis revealed that the gifted adolescent is at risk for varying degrees of depression when any or all of these needs are stymied. In particular, meeting communion needs – for meaningful spiritual and emotional exchange – proved problematic for the gifted teen who is often isolated because of extraordinary innate cognitive and emotional complexity. The results from this study have strong implications for specific developmental support and for appropriate therapeutic intervention.

Fostering The Social And Emotional Development Of Gifted Children Through Guided Viewing Of Film

Teachers of gifted elementary school students seek strategies appropriate for fostering healthy social and emotional development in children. The authors propose guided viewing of film as a strategy through which teachers and counselors may assist young gifted students in gaining helpful insights to deal with problems they face. This article presents a theoretical foundation for this approach, a variety of strategies for implementation, and a collection of films appropriate for use with gifted students.

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